Why The Digital Nomad Lifestyle Appeals To Millennials & Gen Z

Why The Digital Nomad Lifestyle Appeals To Millennials & Gen Z

With reliable access to technology and connectivity improving in line with 5G, digital nomads will find it even easier to keep in touch. And complete tasks as they travel and explore new countries.

Countries are even adapting their visa policies to try to attract more digital nomads. Barbados was among the first to introduce a 12-month visa for remote workers. Tourism authorities in Mallorca are promoting “workations” with hotels offering long-stay packages at favourable rates to British visitors into 2021. Whilst Croatia is setting up a 12-month “digital nomad visa” and Germany has one for freelancers.

The trend is being driven by young people in jobs that can be done from anywhere. Relocation platform Move Hub has reported a 32% increase in exits from the UK since Lockdown 1.0, more than 6,700 households. Year-on-year data from the platform shows an 83% rise in 18 to 34 year-olds moving overseas.

The following articles explore why the digital nomad lifestyle appeals to Millenials and Gen Z in greater detail.


How Digital Nomads Are Shaping The Way Millennials & Gen Z Work

Digital Nomads: The Remote Millennial Workforce

Young People Embrace Remote Working From The Beach

 


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How Digital Nomads Are Shaping The Way Millennials & Gen Z Work

by: FOXYpreneur
Published on: November 27, 2019
 

Why The Digital Nomad Lifestyle Appeals To Millennials And Gen Z


With 5G on the rise, digital nomadism is set to increase as reliable access to technology and connectivity improves. Enabling this workforce to keep in touch and complete tasks as they travel and explore new countries.

Working a 9-5 job may still be the norm for many. But it’s been predicted that the number of digital nomads will reach 1 billion by the year 2035. With this new tribe making waves in the world of work, Instant Offices looks into how they are changing the way Millennials and Generation Z think about their careers and travel.

More than 4.9 million Brits now identify as self-employed with freelancers comprising 42% and 6% of the UK workforce, according to IPSE. In the US, 4.8 million independent workers describe themselves as digital nomads according to a report by MBO Partners. A study from Upwork in 2019 shows 57 million Americans identify as freelancers. A 4 million increase from 2014 with 53% of freelancers Gen Z workers.

However, it’s not all lazing on the beach and sipping on Pina Coladas

A recent study shows remote workers are 13% more productive than office workers and most likely to take fewer sick days. With 23% willing to put in extra hours to finish their tasks.

The Most Common Digital Nomads Fields

  • Design
  • Marketing
  • Development
  • Content Creation
  • Media
  • Consulting

The majority of the available positions are geared towards developers and programmers, at 20%. Consultant positions were the second-most requested, at 8%. Data entry processors followed this at 6%, sales managers at 4% and help desk staff at 3%.

A recent Joblift study revealed that vacancies for digital nomads have increased by 8% month-on-month in the UK. That’s four times the rate of the country’s job market. So, while remote working positions being offered currently account for just 0.03% of the UK job market, they are steadily rising.

Industries Adapting To The Digital Nomad Lifestyle

Office Space

Digital nomads are on the lookout for highly flexible, short-term workspace options. Which provide them with a productive environment without tying them into a traditional workspace lease. A hot desk in a co-working space is the perfect solution. And there has been an increase in fully connected and equipped co-working spaces. In key locations around the world to cater to these frequent travelers.

Insurance

A growing number of travel insurance companies now offer packages tailored to digital nomads. Benefits can range from international healthcare plans to cover for valuables like laptops and cameras. Or accident insurance for those who enjoy extreme sports and adventure activities.

More companies today are offering international data plans for smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Services like Google Fi and Sprint Global Roaming are fast becoming the norm.
Banking

Trying to regulate earnings and taxes can be a real headache when traveling between countries and earning from clients in multiple currencies. Services like Curve are making life easier for digital nomads. And cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin are helping travelers to cut through a lot of the red tape around international payments.

To get an insight into the world of Digital Nomads, Instant Offices spoke to Jade Sarkhel and Richard Maule, two digital nomads from London currently based in Bali

“We 100% feel we are more productive, but it takes commitment! The quote “work expands to fill the time available” seems to apply to us when we were working our 9-5 jobs in the city. If you’re working for another company as a digital nomad, then it’s likely that you’ll make sure you get all your work done in the shortest time possible. Therefore making you a lot more efficient. As a digital nomad business owner, it requires a lot of discipline and self-made structure to ensure you remain productive!”

John Williams, Head of Marketing at Instant Offices commented how offices spaces is changing around this new generation of workers

“As the modern workforce shifts and more people explore how to be a digital nomad, office space choice is changing significantly. The rise of co-working spaces across the world means digital nomads will always find themselves conveniently close to a meeting space or board room when needed. With access to excellent connectivity and business amenities.”

Originally published by Startups Magazine: How Digital Nomads Are Shaping The Way Millennials & Gen Z Work


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Digital Nomads: The Remote Millennial Workforce

by Caity Dalby, Content Manager, Figaro Digital

IPSE

Why The Digital Nomad Lifestyle Appeals To Millennials And Gen Z


As a company situated as an observer within the digital marketing industry, it is even more apparent that the ways in which digital has changed the world of work. Not only impacting what we do, but how we do it. This is the case for most brands, agencies, and tech providers in our industry and beyond.

This digital shift has been in the making since the birth of the internet

We are now hurtling full steam ahead towards a 21st Century Technological/Industrial Revolution. Mechanised looms and large-scale coal mining transformed the face of industry, business and work. Devices that are small enough to fit in the palm of your hand are doing so now.

NASA revealed in 2013 that the average smartphone, let’s take an iPhone 5 for example. Yes, I do still have one and am in the proverbial dark ages of telecommunications. The iPhone has more computing power and ‘about 240,000 times the memory of a Voyager spacecraft’. So just imagine what the likes of the iPhone XS or Huwawei P30 pro could do, let alone the latest MacBook Pro or ChromeBook.

What this all means for work, employment, and the humble office is becoming more apparent with every technological advancement

From Google Docs to virtual meetings and online HR portals – each has contributed to building a working environment in which a laptop or phone and connection to WiFi is often all that is necessary to complete a days work.

It is no surprise that this has also had a knock on effect on how we create businesses. Millennials and their younger – and even more digitally savvy – Gen Z counterparts are ideating. And building products and businesses around this idea of “digital nomadity” and location independence. But what does it all really mean? And what even are Digital Nomads?

Why The Digital Nomad Lifestyle Appeals To Millennials And Gen Z

What Even Are Digital Nomads?

The term Digital Nomad has become somewhat of an umbrella term. Encompassing many aspects of temporary or remote digital employment and the make-up of the modern workforce.

The category includes those who have thought ahead and trained in a digital or transportable skill. Such as coding, web design, writing, animation, consulting, etc. Who can do this work freelance from anywhere in the world, or can pick up temporary contracts while on their travels.

This is how freelance writer Stephanie Lee lives her digitally nomadic life

But as she states in her blog on the subject, it’s not all a walk in the park. It’s tiring living nomadically and it can be emotionally draining continuously moving away from new personal and professional connections to chase the wanderlust dream.  Furthermore, it can be difficult to keep up with the voyeuristic expectations that are often placed on your career, life, and choices as a side affect of digital nomadity.

But it’s not all negative

Another form of digital nomadism can be seen in the recent trend of working sabbaticals. Spurred on by technologies that make working remotely increasingly easy. But that’s an oxymoron I hear you say. It is, but the ability for employees and their families to move temporarily to another country. Or just simply travel whilst working remotely, can only be described as that. It’s either that or a busman’s holiday and working sabbatical sounds much more glamorous.

Regardless of what we call it, the ability for employees to travel and experience different parts of the world or simply move to care for a loved one. Whilst still being able to work remotely is a step towards the seemingly unattainable utopia of a ‘good work-life balance’. Think of it as the digital sister of flexible hours, working from home, and unlimited holiday allowance.

And finally, there are the location independents within the Digital Nomad group

These are the most digital and truly nomadic of all. Those identifying as Location Independent are part of an entirely new style of worker. Whose lives are facilitated by the growing trend in fully digital, entrepreneurial businesses that can be run from anywhere in the world. However, while they are facilitated by these digital businesses, they also feed the creation of them.

The digital transformation of the workplace, employment, and businesses has fostered a chicken and egg situation. What came first, the tech savvy Millennial with the drive to be Location Independent. Or the digital flexibility a modern, technologically advanced workplace provides?

Why The Digital Nomad Lifestyle Appeals To Millennials And Gen Z

Redundant Or Relevant?

But what has this trend got to do with anything? And more specifically, what has it got to do with the digital marketing industry? Do we even care, is the concept of a Digital Nomad redundant or relevant?

With any trend you have to maintain a healthy amount of skepticism about its relevance and sticking power, especially in a world and industry that is evolving at such a rapid pace. Having said that, it seems highly unlikely that Millennials, Gen Z’s, and the younger generations that will follow them into the digital workplace will gravitate back towards the reliable 9-5 office routine. Or traditional business models. And it will be sooner than you think that businesses, that can accommodate it, will consist of a truly global workforce.

As the Digital Nomad trend continues to grow, it is worth businesses in digital heavy sectors, or within the digital marketing industry itself, to keep a watchful eye on it

If the trend carries on as is, a certain level of flexibility and access to remote working will become an expected norm in the recruitment and retention of digital talent from the younger generations. You don’t want to loose innovative newcomers to competitors simply because of an antiquated bums-on-seats mentality.

Even if it isn’t possible to provide a workplace with digitally nomadic opportunities, flexibility is key

Meet your employees in the middle and ensure that there is adequate support in place for the freelance Digital Nomads that grace your off/online office. There is a huge online community surrounding the digitally nomadic lifestyle and word will spread that you’re an employer to aim for.

Additionally, and possibly more importantly, the new digital businesses that are built and run by Digital Nomads will become your competition. Whilst it can be incredibly difficult to run a business remotely, there is something to be said for the knowledge that can be gained whilst experiencing different cultures and markets. Don’t silo yourself and ensure that you keep your outlook global, otherwise these globetrotting Digital Nomads will sweep the metaphorical rug out from under you.


Originally published by Figaro Digital: Digital Nomads: The Remote Millennial Workforce

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Young People Embrace Remote Working – From The Beach

Young people embrace remote working - from the beach
Year-on-year data shows an 83 per cent rise in 18 to 34-year-olds moving overseas

Ben Clatworthy, Assistant Travel Editor
Saturday November 21 2020, 12.01am, The Times

When Beth Cammack booked a fortnight in Fuerteventura, departing in early September, it was meant to be two weeks in the sunshine. “I just wanted to get away from England for a break,” she said. However, once she settled into life in the Canary Islands she decided to stay. First delaying her flight home, then cancelling it.

“It’s just so much better than the UK at the moment and the sun shines every day,” she said. “I can do most of my work from here so I can split my time between that and surfing. It was a no-brainer.”

Ms Cammack, 24, is among a growing number of people who are swapping their bedrooms and kitchen tables for sun, sea and sand. Travel companies are adapting their programmes to offer long-term breaks for Britons who are able to work remotely. Overseas rental companies are also reporting a surge in demand from people looking for a base to hunker down during the winter.

Young people embrace remote working - from the beach
Kent Vorland said that swapping London for Greece was best for his mental health

Chloe Cavey runs the Waverider Surf School on Fuerteventura with her partner, Nathan. The company has a villa that sleeps 17 and are preparing to introduce “work and surf” packages in the coming weeks.

“We have seen a huge increase in demand for people wanting to work from abroad,” Ms Cavey said. “Since September virtually everyone who comes here is extending their stays. Next week we’re getting fibre-optic internet installed to boost the wifi speed and are also looking at getting more work stations fitted.”

Experts say that the trend is being driven by young people in jobs that can be done from anywhere

Move Hub, a relocation platform, has reported a 32% increase in exits from the UK since the first lockdown — more than 6,700 households.

“We’ve seen an unprecedentedly sharp rise in young people leaving the UK,” Charlie Clissitt, of Move Hub, said. “With many businesses moving to long-term remote working in March and most 18 to 24-year-olds typically not having the anchor of children or mortgages, it seems many have thought, ‘If I’m not required in an office, I may as well be working from a beach’.”

Young people embrace remote working - from the beach
Beth Cammack extended her two-week trip to the Canary Islands indefinitely

Year-on-year data from the platform shows an 83% rise in 18 to 34-year-olds moving overseas but a 49% decline in 35 to 44-year olds heading abroad.

Ms Cammack, from St Helens, Merseyside, models for a living but has carried on much of her work from the island.

“My agency has rung a few times to try and get me to come back for shoots, but for now I am staying here.”

Countries are adapting their visa policies to try to attract more “digital nomads” — people who can work from anywhere. The Caribbean island of Barbados was among the first to introduce a 12-month visa for remote workers. Tourism authorities in Mallorca are promoting “workations” with hotels offering long-stay packages at favourable rates to British visitors into 2021. Croatia is setting up a 12-month “digital nomad visa” while Germany has one for freelancers.

Samantha Sadler, 28, moved from Newcastle to Sicily in September with her fiancée

“The contract on our flat was up…We’d always fancied doing something like this and it allowed us to escape the weather at home.”

Young people embrace remote working - from the beach
Eugenie Dolberg moved to Sicily for three months during the first lockdown
Eugenie Dolberg, 41, a focus coach, also moved to the region for three months during the first lockdown

“I used to do a lot of my sessions in person but Covid-19 moved them on to Zoom so it didn’t matter where I worked from.”

Kent Vorland, the chief executive of Simply Pay Me, a software company, has no plans to leave Greece and describes his decision to leave London in August as the best for his mental health.

“Five months of working from home was having an increasingly negative impact on my mindset,” Mr Vorland, 30, said. “I’ve been able to take advantage of better weather, more outdoor time and I’ve taken up learning Greek.”

Jess Salamanca, the founder of Banana Scoops, an ice cream brand, had just booked a holiday in the Canary Islands with her partner when the second lockdown in England was announced. They scrapped their hotel booking in favour of a longer stay.

“We managed to find a lovely villa for a third of the price of what it usually costs,” she said. “We’re currently looking at returning to the UK at the start of December. But may well extend if the lockdown at home is extended”.

Originally published in The Times: Young People Embrace Remote Working – From The Beach


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